Transcript: Episode 92 – Health Savings Accounts 101
June 22, 2020

In this video, JoyPowered® author/podcast host JoDee Curtis explains what a “personal brand” is and shares her suggestions for figuring out what your brand is.

Video transcript:

Hi, I’m JoDee Curtis, co-host of The JoyPowered® Workspace Podcast. I’m sharing with you today some tips around personal branding. You might wonder why this is an important topic. Well, if you’re looking for a new role, interested in a promotion, or simply wanting to leave a better, stronger impression of yourself, I think you’ll be interested to hear more.

First, let’s define what I even mean by a personal brand. Well, some common definitions I like are, number one, another word for your reputation. Or what are people saying about you when you leave the room? Or others perceptions of you. And number four, a combination of your behaviors and habits.

Also, how do you even know what your personal brand is? I bet some of you are thinking that you don’t have one. Well, you do. So let’s find out what that is. Consider doing a few of these. Number one, Google yourself, because other people are. What comes up? Number two, text about five people whom you trust and ask them for three words they would use to describe you. I did this and I heard some very flattering things about myself, but one person who was very honest said, “distracted.” Ouch. That hurt, but only because I knew it was true. And I’m working on that one. Number three, take a personality assessment. CliftonStrengths® or DiSC® are two of my favorites, and I can help you with both of those. But ask yourself, am I positively using my strengths and my personality style? Number four, participate in a 360 degree feedback survey about yourself or a well-prepared annual review. What are people saying about you? What do you do well, and what can you improve? Take your answers to all of these to heart and investigate them further. Why is that perception of you out there, and what can you do to improve it? I recently had a coaching client whose boss engaged me to work with him on his executive presence, really his personal brand. I immediately asked him, “What words do you think your company leaders would use to describe you?” He said, “I’m articulate, I’m responsive, and I communicate very well, but I’m always late and a former boss once told me I bring chaos to a meeting.” Ugh. Initially, he didn’t seem to concerned about this at all, until we talked about his frustration at not being promoted. He wasn’t connecting that personal brand with his lack of a promotion, but his company leaders were, and he wanted to do better.

Our brand is a combination of how others view you, on social media, in a meeting, and not just when you leave the room, but how do you enter the room. Note also that research says that perception is 55% visual, 38% vocal, and 7% verbal. Many times in a meeting or a presentation, we get overly focused on what we are going to say, and forget to focus on how we present ourselves visually or vocally. So are you dressed for the occasion? Are you put together well? Is your picture on LinkedIn representative of how you want others to see you? That doesn’t mean you have to be all suit and tie, by the way. I know for sure that’s not my brand. Are you a marathon runner, maybe? Because sharing that information might project preparation, tenacity, and discipline. What are you posting on social media or sharing, and do they represent how you want your boss, a hiring manager, or maybe your grandma to perceive you? Are you on time and are you well organized?

So what will you do to enhance your personal brand? Would you like more ideas on leadership or on personal branding? Check out our JoyPowered® podcast wherever you listen to your podcasts, or go directly to getjoypowered.com/podcast. Thanks and make it a JoyPowered® day, every day.

Emily Miller
Emily Miller
Emily works behind the scenes at JoyPowered, helping to edit and publish the books, producing the podcast, and running the website and social media.

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